The Most Endangered and Trafficked Species Species in the World

Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus)

Slender horned gazelle
Gazella leptoceros

Pygmy Slow Loris
Nycticebus pygmaeus

Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat
Lasiorhinus krefftii

IUCN Classification: Vulnerable

CITES Classification: Appendix I

History

The oncilla is a small spotted cat native to montane and tropical rainforests of Central and South America. The oncilla is a primarily terrestrial animal but is also an adept climber. Like all cats, the oncilla is an obligate carnivore, requiring meat for survival. This cat eats small mammals, lizards, birds, eggs, invertebrates, and the occasional tree frog. Occasionally, the cat will eat grasses.

Threats

The main threats to the oncilla are deforestation and poaching. Oncillas are killed for their pelts, which are highly prized and often sold or made into clothing. They are also threatened by human expansion, largely due to coffee plantations.

Range

Brazil

IUCN Classification: Vulnerable

CITES Classification: Appendix I

History

Slender horned gazelles are adapted to live in desert environments, with their pale coats to reflect the sun’s rays and their enlarged hooves to help them walk on the sand. The extreme heat of this environment limits their feeding to the early morning and evening. They obtain most of their water requirements from grazing on grass, and browsing on succulents, herbs and shrubs, but will drink water when there are available sources. Their social organization is likely to be flexible and adaptable to variation in conditions. In general they are observed to form groups of three to ten individuals, made up of one dominant male, several females and their young.

Threats

The main threat to the slender horned gazelle is hunting and poaching for its meat and horns, which are used as ornaments.

Range

Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Niger, Sudan, Tunisia

IUCN Classification: Vulnerable

CITES Classification: Appendix 

History

The animal is nocturnal and arboreal, crawling along branches using slow movements in search of prey. Unlike other primates, pygmy slow lorises do not leap. They live together in small groups, usually with one or two offspring. Their diet consists of fruits, insects, small fauna, tree sap, and floral nectar. Pygmy slow lorises have a toxic bite, which they get by licking a toxic secretion from glands on the inside of its elbows.

Threats

The habitat of the pygmy slow loris in Vietnam was greatly reduced due to extensive burning, clearing, and defoliating of forests during the Vietnam War. In addition to habitat destruction, the pygmy slow loris is seriously threatened by hunting and trade. Extensive hunting for traditional medicines and extermination as a crop pest is currently putting severe pressure on pygmy slow loris populations. They are also sold on the market as food and pets.

Range

Cambodia, Lao, Vietnam, China (native uncertain)

IUCN Classification: Critically Endangered

CITES Classification: Appendix I

History

The northern hairy nosed wombat is one of the rarest land mammals in the world. In the last census taken in 2010, the estimated population was 163 individuals, but in recent years, the population has experienced a slow but steady increase. Northern hairy-nosed wombats are nocturnal, living underground in networks of burrows, and feed on native grasses.  Their fat reserves and low metabolic allow them to go without food for several days when food is scarce. The northern hairy-nosed wombat has very poor eyesight and its survival is dependent on its superior sense of smell, which it uses to detect its food in the dark.

Threats

Threats to the northern hairy-nosed wombat include small population size, predation, competition for food, disease, floods, droughts, wildfires, and habitat loss.

Range

Australia

Many More to Come!

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